Frequently Asked Questions

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Frequently Asked Questions

 
Who are the PRTB?
What is the Non Principal Private Residence charge [NPPR]?
What is the Household Charge?
Do my tenants pay the Household Charge?
How much is the Household Charge?
Why should I pay the Household Charge?
I own a large house which is split into five bedsits, how much will I have to pay?
I do not have my house rented out to anyone at the moment - do I still pay the Household Charge?
I am renting a property - do I have to pay the HouseHold Charge?
How do I pay the Household Charge?
Who is the SEAI?
Can I get help making my property energy efficient?
I am having trouble paying my mortgage? What should I do?
I am having trouble paying my rent? What should I do?
Can I evict my tenants?
I am in dispute with my tenant over the deposit, what can I do?
What is the Property Tax?
How do I pay the Property Tax?

 

Who are the PRTB?

The PRTB [Private Residential Tenancy Board] operates a national tenancy registration system. They also resolves disputes between landlords and tenants. It was established in 2004 and they provide policy advice to the government on the private rented sector. Their website is : http://www.prtb.ie

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What is the Non Principal Private Residence charge [NPPR]?

This annual charge was introduced in 2009 in respect of residential property that is not the owner’s only or main residence. It is a charge of €200 due on 31st March each year. The charge is paid to the local authorities of the county in which the residence is located.

This Non-Principal Private Residence charge or NPPR is payable to the local authority and the money goes towards funding local authority services.

You also have to pay the Household Charge on the property. In Budget 2013, a new Local Property Tax (LPT) was introduced to start in 2013, and this replaces both the Household Charge and the NPPR. But although this is being replaced, the NPPR will still apply for 2013. It will be abolished in 2014 and any outstanding arrears will be added to the Local Property Tax due on the property to be collected by the Revenue Commissioners.

More information is available on the NPPR charge on their website: https://www.nppr.ie/

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What is the Household Charge?

The Household Charge is an annual charge introduced by the Local Government (Household Charge) Act 2011, which is payable by the owners of residential property.

The owner could register the property since 1st January 2012. The Household Charge was also introduced in order to assist the building of a national property database in preparation for the 2013 Property Tax. The Property Tax will replace the Household Charge.

The charge contributes to essential services in your community which benefits everyone. Services such as:

* fire and emergency services
* maintenance and cleaning of streets
* planning and development
* public parks
* street lighting
* libraries
* open spaces
* leisure amenities

There is a legal obligation to be registered and pay the Household Charge and there are already many people who have been fined. Fines are based an incremental scale depending on how late the payment is carried out. At this stage, payment is more than 12 months late so a payment of 30% of charge plus 1% interest per month on the total.

If it is brought to court the maximum fine is €2,500.00.

The charge remains attached to the property.

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Do my tenants pay the Household Charge?

No. The owner of the property must pay the Household Charge / Property Tax.

If you wish to increase the rent to absorb the costs of owning the property for rent, you must alert your current tenants in the appropriate manner. You may review the rent once per year, and if you increase it, you must give your tenants 28 days notice in writing before implementing the increase.

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How much is the Household Charge?

The Household Charge is €100.

There is a legal obligation to be registered and pay the Household Charge. Fines are based an incremental scale depending on how late the payment is carried out. At this stage, payment is more than 12 months late so a payment of 30% of charge plus 1% interest per month on the total.

If it is brought to court the maximum fine is €2,500.00.

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Why should I pay the Household Charge?

The Household Charge will be used by local authorities to provide services essential to your community and benefit everyone, as will the Property Tax which will follow on from the Household Charge after it is ceased.

Such services include:

* fire and emergency services
* maintenance and cleaning of streets
* planning and development
* public parks
* street lighting
* libraries
* open spaces
* leisure amenities.

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I own a large house which is split into three bedsits, how much will I have to pay?

The term "residential property" refers to houses, maisonettes, flats, apartments and bedsits.  So if you own a single property split into, for example, 3 bedsits, you will be liable for three lots of Household Charge.

However, if you are renting a house to more than 1 tenant, in which each tenant has a bedroom but all use the common areas (washing facilities, bathrooms, kitchens, living area etc.) then this is considered 1 property and therefore only liable for one Household Charge.

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I do not have my house rented out to anyone at the moment - do I still pay the Household Charge?

If a building is suitable for occupation, then you must pay the Household Charge irrespective of whether someone is currently living in it or not.

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I am renting a property - do I have to pay the HouseHold Charge?

No. As a tenant you do not have to register or pay the household charge. The owner of the property must do so.

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How do I pay the Household Charge?

As an owner of a property you can pay your Household Charge online by VISA, Mastercard and Laser on the Household Charge website. http://www.householdcharge.ie/

You can also print a registration form (available here from the Household Charge website) and send it via post to Household Charge, PO Box 12168, Dublin 1.

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Who is the SEAI?

The Sustainable Energy Authority of Ireland [SEAI] was established as Ireland's national energy authority under the Sustainable Energy Act 2002.

SEAI's mission is to play a leading role in transforming Ireland into a society based on sustainable energy structures, technologies and practices, while providing advice to the government, and delivering a range of programmes efficiently and effectively, while engaging and motivating a wide range of stakeholders.

Their key strategic objects are :

    Implementing strong energy efficiency actions to radically reduce energy intensity and usage
    Accelerating the development and adoption of technologies to exploit low-carbon, renewable energy sources
    Supporting evidence-based responses that engage all actors, supporting innovation and enterprise for our low-carbon future.

Read more about the SEAI on their website - www.seai.ie

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Can I get help making my property energy efficient?

Whether in your home or business, the SEAI is available to assist you in being aware of the changes you can make (big and small) on a daily basis to save energy. With information on how to heat your home for less, using the most energy efficient appliances, optimizing the natural and artificial lighting in your home, and much more, the SEAI website [ http://www.seai.ie] is very useful for helping you make your property energy efficient. They can even advise on the grants available.

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I am having trouble paying my mortgage? What should I do?

There are a number of websites available which can give you advice on how to save money and pay your mortgage.

With help identifying your insurance, mortgage, telephone bills, electricity costs, gas rates, credit cards and other direct debits, Good Financial Housekeeping [ www.goodfinancialhousekeeping.ie ] can help you find whether you are paying too much and if there is an option which could suit your budget better.
You can call them for an appointment without any obligation.

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I am having trouble paying my rent? What should I do?

There are a number of websites available which can give you advice on how to save money and pay your rent.

With help identifying your insurance, mortgage, telephone bills, electricity costs, gas rates, credit cards and other direct debits, Good Financial Housekeeping [ www.goodfinancialhousekeeping.ie ] can help you find whether you are paying too much and if there is an option which could suit your budget better.
You can call them for an appointment without any obligation.

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Can I evict my tenants?

It is possible to request your tenants leave your rental property however, a number of procedures need to be implemented to ensure it is handled correctly.

You must provide your tenant with notice when you ask them to leave - the duration of the notice will depend on how long your tenant has been renting your property and the reason that they must leave. You may only ask them to leave without providing a reason during the first 6 months of a tenancy.
Landlords can terminate a tenancy that has lasted between six months and four years (a Part 4 tenancy) only in the following circumstances:

    After 3 and ½ years
    If the tenant does not comply with the obligations of the tenancy
    If the property is no longer suited to the tenants’ needs (e.g. overcrowded)
    If the landlord needs the property for him/herself or for an immediate family member
    If the landlord intends to sell the property
    If the landlord intends to refurbish the property
    If the landlord plans to change the business use of the property (e.g. turn it into offices).

Please note that you can be reported to the PRTB if you evict for a specific reason (such as your intention to live in the property) and if this is not carried out.

In order for your notice of termination to be valid it must be in writing, signed by you (the landlord) or alternatively an autorised agent. It must also specify the date of termination, the reason for termination and state that any issue with the notice must be referred to the PRTB within 28 days from receipt of the notice.

You may then post the letter to the tenant, give it in person, or leave it at the property for the tenant.

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I am in dispute with my tenant over the deposit, what can I do?

You should initially endeavour to resolve the dispute between you both. A meeting may clear up any misunderstandings that might have occurred previously and will allow you to hear each other's opinions.

It is also a good idea to ensure that you keep all correspondence between you and your tenant, and if required, you may wish to present your side of the situation in writing. They may not be aware of your rights. Please note that it is illegal for you to hold your tenant's possessions in lieu of money owed, but you can make an application to the PRTB if you feel that the deposit does not cover the rent arrears or the damage to the property.

Your Local Authority may be required to be involved in resolving the dispute, or the PRTB.

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What is the Property Tax?

The Local Property Tax is replacing the Household Charge and will be based on the value of the property and will be starting in July 2013.

The rate is calculated by:
0.18% for the first 1 million of value
and
0.25% on the portion of the value over 1 Million.

The minimum tax is €90 a year on houses less than €100,000.
Properties valued over €1m will be assessed at the actual value (no banding will apply) at €1800 plus  0.25% of the portion of the value above €1m

As with the original Household Charge, tenants of rented properties will not be liable for the Property Tax.

No bills or invoices will be sent out - it is paid on a self-declaration basis. You can find out more information about the property tax at :

A voluntary deferral will be available to those whose gross income limits do not exceed €15,000 for a single person and €25,000 for a couple.

A deferral option will also be available up to the end of 2017 where gross income less 80 per cent of mortgage interest falls below €15,000 for single people and €25,000 for a couple.

The local property tax will eventually have to be paid when the house is sold or on death of the owner. A 4%  annual interest rate on the tax will be charged on any deferred amounts.

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How do I pay the Property Tax?

Currently there is no website for the Property Tax. However in March 2013, based on the names in the database built by the Household Charge, Local Property Tax Return forms will be sent out.

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